Saturday, 3 March 2018

Modern Reading

It is no secret the general reading habits of the well read have changed over this past decades or so. I do not count myself a well read person, but I recall the likes of Sam Harris noting how the frequency of finishing books went down over the past few years and how the task of reading a thick book seems way more daunting than it used to be just a few years back.
And I agree. On one hand I am reading more than I ever had, but on the other the number of books I have been reading has been decreasing from the paltry to the shameful. It’s actually quite a simple equation: between my RSS feeds (yes, I’m old style, I use RSS rather than social media to drive my feeds; I get to choose what comes in, rather than a commercially interested algorithm) and my podcast listening, I get to spend the bulk of my leisure time reading short articles and the bulk of my non leisure commute time listening to stuff of, frankly, not too dissimilar a nature.
Whatever time is left for books is rather minimal. More interestingly, the books I choose to pick and read in the first place are usually books that I have read about in my feed or books I have heard about in those podcasts that I listen to. Not surprisingly, given the nature of my feeds and my favourite podcasts, these tend to narrow on the non fiction category.
Yet there is much amiss here. I noticed, for example, how reading those non fiction books cover to cover does not tend to enlighten me significantly more than that article I already read or that podcast I’ve listened to already did. Given how valuable my book reading time has become, and given the value I still credit book reading with (despite my actions saying the contrary), I concluded it’s time to change.
So I’m thinking of an overhaul. Instead of focusing my book reading on the non fiction department, I will leave non fiction [mostly] to articles and podcasts and focus my book reading on fiction instead. To kick this off, I am looking at some of the books I loved the most as a child: we are talking science fiction books, mostly, but also fantasy, from an era when books did not have to weigh a ton and a book did not have to be a part of a trilogy. I’m hoping this would let me over the ditch I find myself stuck in with contemporary science fiction.
We’ll see how it goes. Preliminary reports indicate that a great book can work wonders on my mojo, but a meh book can work the same way - albeit in the opposite direction.

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