Thursday, 26 April 2018

Times Are Tough

Just wanted to apologise for the lack of posting, and leave you with a relevant material to study in the mean time:

Saturday, 3 March 2018

Modern Reading

It is no secret the general reading habits of the well read have changed over this past decades or so. I do not count myself a well read person, but I recall the likes of Sam Harris noting how the frequency of finishing books went down over the past few years and how the task of reading a thick book seems way more daunting than it used to be just a few years back.
And I agree. On one hand I am reading more than I ever had, but on the other the number of books I have been reading has been decreasing from the paltry to the shameful. It’s actually quite a simple equation: between my RSS feeds (yes, I’m old style, I use RSS rather than social media to drive my feeds; I get to choose what comes in, rather than a commercially interested algorithm) and my podcast listening, I get to spend the bulk of my leisure time reading short articles and the bulk of my non leisure commute time listening to stuff of, frankly, not too dissimilar a nature.
Whatever time is left for books is rather minimal. More interestingly, the books I choose to pick and read in the first place are usually books that I have read about in my feed or books I have heard about in those podcasts that I listen to. Not surprisingly, given the nature of my feeds and my favourite podcasts, these tend to narrow on the non fiction category.
Yet there is much amiss here. I noticed, for example, how reading those non fiction books cover to cover does not tend to enlighten me significantly more than that article I already read or that podcast I’ve listened to already did. Given how valuable my book reading time has become, and given the value I still credit book reading with (despite my actions saying the contrary), I concluded it’s time to change.
So I’m thinking of an overhaul. Instead of focusing my book reading on the non fiction department, I will leave non fiction [mostly] to articles and podcasts and focus my book reading on fiction instead. To kick this off, I am looking at some of the books I loved the most as a child: we are talking science fiction books, mostly, but also fantasy, from an era when books did not have to weigh a ton and a book did not have to be a part of a trilogy. I’m hoping this would let me over the ditch I find myself stuck in with contemporary science fiction.
We’ll see how it goes. Preliminary reports indicate that a great book can work wonders on my mojo, but a meh book can work the same way - albeit in the opposite direction.

Monday, 5 February 2018

A Tale of Headphones

When asked, I openly admit to keeping my distance from fellow Israelis. Unlike other Israelis I know in Australia, who lead a life identical to that they had in Israel in everything but the physical location copied many thousands of kilometres across, I shy from the Israeli.
It has been very hard for me to explain why, though. However, the following story might shed some light. It does not offer an explicit explanation, but it does say most of what there is for me to say on the matter. I call it: a tale of headphones.

Last time I left Israel from a family visit on my way back home, I sat on board an El Al 747 jet. I wore my wired Bose QC25 headphones, which I greatly admired for their noise cancellation (on which I counted for the long flights ahead) and comfort, but generally disliked for their sound quality (admittedly not the biggest of problems in the noisy environment that is the inside of an old jet crowded with Israelis). All of this took place shortly after Bose had announced their then latest model, the QC35 headphones, which were essentially the same headphones with slightly better noise cancellation and - the Crown Jewels - wireless operation via Bluetooth.
Anyway.
As the plane was getting ready to take off, a guy I never saw before and will almost certainly never see again walked across the aisle and stopped by my seat. I looked up to see him staring at me, and took my headphones off so I could hear what he was trying to say to me.
“Oh, best headphones in the world. For wired headphones”, he said in Hebrew.
And he walked away.