Friday, 22 May 2015

The Netflix Tax

Netflix mailer packaging: October 2013

I seem to have stumbled upon a trend: I try to access the Internet at night, but it’s just not there.
Some websites, including major ones, seem simply out of reach; others are so slow to load that it’s just not worth it. [Excuse the technical jargon, but it appears as if I am unable to reach my DNS server.] The situation seems at its worst on Sunday nights.
What gives?

I’ll give you my hypothesis: it starts with net and ends with flix. Or, in other words, the recent official release of Netflix in Australia has broken all dams, and now Australians are streaming videos at large. As they should, and as they should have been able to for years if it wasn’t for the copyright monopoly bastards’ greed keeping us back in the Stone Age.
However, now that the genie has been uncorked, the lack of infrastructure is made rather too glaringly obvious. Years, if not decades, of poor investment in core technologies, have been exposed within the lengths of a month or two.

The good thing is, the Liberals’ latest budget has pretty much left the NBN in ashes with all hope of infrastructure improvements decimated. So we know that we’re going to be stuck in the dark ages with unusable Internet for years to come. Because that is the vision that the politicians we have elected are offering us!
I don’t know about you, but I’d like to see some change.


Image by Bill Rogers, Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) licence

2 comments:

wile.e.coyote said...

Just saw an article that Netflix are on their way to to conquer the world this year, and Israel is in their plans as well.
They also mentioned that people in Australia are not satisfied with the service as it only provide 1100 titles compared to the 7000 titles they present in the USA.

Hebrew link
http://www.calcalist.co.il/marketing/articles/0,7340,L-3659973,00.html?ref=ynet

Moshe Reuveni said...

Very bad article from Calcalist.
Makes it sound as if Netflix chose to start off in Australia with only 1100 movies, when it was the copyright monopoly that wouldn't let them secure the rights for more.
The same goes for other countries: I'm sure that if Netflix could, they would have had all the movies in the world. And I'm sure Amazon would want to sell Kindle versions of all books, etc.